Online Encyclopedia

AMYMONE

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V01, Page 900 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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AMYMONE, in ancient Greek legend, daughter of Danaiis. With her sisters, she had been sent to look for water, the district of Argos being then parched through the anger of Poseidon. Amymone having thrown her spear at a stag, missed it, but hit a satyr asleep in the brake. The satyr pursued her, and she called for help on Poseidon, who appeared, and for love of her beauty caused a spring to well up, which received her name. Aeschylus wrote a satyric drama on the subject. By the god Amymone became the mother of Nauplius, the wrecker. Her meeting with Poseidon at the spring is frequently represented on ancient coins and gems. Apollodorus ii. 1, 4; Hyginus, Fab. 169; Propertius ii. 26. AMYNTAS I., king of Macedonia (c. 540—498 B.C.), was a tributary vassal of Darius Hystaspes. With him the history of Macedonia may be said to begin. He was the first of its rulers to have relations with other countries; he entered into an alliance with the Peisistratidae, and when Hippias was driven out of Athens he offered him the territory of Anthemus on the Thermalc Gulf, with the object of turning the Greek party feuds to his own advantage (Herodotus v. 17, 94; Justin vii. 2; Thucydides ii. roc; Pausanias ix. 40). See MACEDONIAN EMPIRE.
End of Article: AMYMONE
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