Online Encyclopedia

BEAT (a word common in various forms ...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V03, Page 582 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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BEAT (a word common in various forms to the Teutonic languages; it is connected with the similar Romanic words derived from the Late Lat. battere), a blow or stroke; from the many applications of the verb " to beat " come various meanings of the substantive, in some of which the primary sense has become obscure. It is applied to tile throbbing of the pulse or heart, to the beating of a drum, either for retreat, or charge, or to quarters; in music to the alternating sound produced by the striking together of two notes not exactly of the same pitch (see SOUND), and also to the movement of the baton by which a conductor of an orchestra or chorus indicates the time, and to the divisions of a bar. As a nautical term, a " beat " is the zigzag course taken by a ship in sailing against the wind. The application of the word to a policeman's or sentry's round comes either from beating a covert for game and hence the term means an exhaustive search of a district, or from the repeated strokes of the foot in constantly walking up and down. In this sense the word is used in America, particularly in Alabama and Mississippi, of a voting precinct.
End of Article: BEAT (a word common in various forms to the Teutonic languages; it is connected with the similar Romanic words derived from the Late Lat. battere)
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