Online Encyclopedia

CARAVEL, or CARVEL (from the Gr. Kapa...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V05, Page 303 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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CARAVEL, or CARVEL (from the Gr. Kapa(3os, a light ship, through the Ital. carabella and the Span. carabas) , a name applied at different times and in different countries to ships of very varying appearance and build, as in Turkey to a ship of war, and in France to a small boat used in the herring fishery. In the 15th and 16th centuries, caravels were much used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages. They were roundish ships, with a double tower at the stern, and a single one in the bows, and were galley rigged. Two out of the three vessels in which Columbus sailed on his voyage of discovery to America were " caravels." Carvel, the older English form, is now used only in the term " carvel-built," for a boat in which the planking is flush with the edges laid side to side, in distinction from " clinker-built," where the edges overlap.
End of Article: CARAVEL, or CARVEL (from the Gr. Kapa(3os, a light ship, through the Ital. carabella and the Span. carabas)
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