Online Encyclopedia

CHANT (derived through the Fr. from t...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V05, Page 846 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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CHANT (derived through the Fr. from the Lat. cantare, to sing; an old form is " chaunt "), a song or melody, particularly one sung according to the rules of church service-books. For an account of the chant or cant us firmus of the Roman Church see PLAIN-SONG. In the English church " chants " are the tunes set to the unmetrical verses of the psalms and canticles. The chant consisted of an " intonation " followed by a reciting note of indefinite length; a " mediation " closed the first part of the verse, leading to a second reciting note; a " termination " closed the second part of the verse. In the English chant the " intonation " disappeared. Chants are " single," if written for one verse only, " double," if for two. " Quadruple " chants for four verses have also been written.
End of Article: CHANT (derived through the Fr. from the Lat. cantare, to sing; an old form is " chaunt ")
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