Online Encyclopedia

HUGH CLAPPERTON (1788-1827)

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V06, Page 423 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
Spread the word: del.icio.us del.icio.us it!

See also:
HUGH CLAPPERTON (1788-1827)  , Scottish traveller in West-Central Africa, was born in 1788 at
See also:
Annan,
See also:
Dumfriesshire, where his
See also:
father was a surgeon . He gained some knowledge of
See also:
practical mathematics and navigation, and at thirteen was apprenticed on board a vessel which traded between Liverpool and North
See also:
America . After having made several voyages across the
See also:
Atlantic he was impressed for the
See also:
navy, in which he soon rose to the rank of
See also:
midshipman . During the
See also:
Napoleonic
See also:
wars he saw a good
See also:
deal of active service, and at the storming of
See also:
Port Louis,
See also:
Mauritius, in November 181o, he was first in the breach and hauled down the French flag . In 1814 he went to
See also:
Canada, was promoted to the rank of
See also:
lieutenant, and to the command of a
See also:
schooner on the
See also:
Canadian lakes . In 1817, when the flotilla on the lakes was dismantled, he returned home on
See also:
half-pay . In 182o Clapperton removed to
See also:
Edinburgh, where he made the acquaintance of Walter Oudney, M.D., who aroused in him an
See also:
interest in
See also:
African travel . Lieut . G . F . Lyon, R.N., having returned from an unsuccessful attempt to reach
See also:
Bornu from Tripoli, the
See also:
British government determined on a second expedition to that country . Dr Oudney was appointed by Lord Bathurst, then colonial secretary, to proceed to Bornu as consul with the
See also:
object of promoting trade, and Clapperton and Major Dixon Denham (q.v.) were added to the party .

From Tripoli,

early in 1822, they set out southward to Murzuk, and from this point Clapperton and Oudney visited the
See also:
Ghat oasis . Kuka, the capital of Bornu, was reached in
See also:
February 1823, and Lake Chad seen for the first time by Europeans . At Bornu the travellers were well received by the sultan; and after remaining in the country till the 14th of December they again set out for the purpose of exploring the course of the Niger . At Murmur, on the road to
See also:
Kano, Oudney died (
See also:
January 1824) . Clapperton continued his journey alone through Kano to
See also:
Sokoto, the capital of the Fula
See also:
empire, where by order of Sultan Bello he was obliged to stop, though the Niger wa.s only five days' journey to the west . Worn out with his travel he returned by way of
See also:
Zaria and
See also:
Katsena to Kuka, where he again met Denham . The two travellers then set out, for Tripoli, reached on the 26th of January 1825 . An account of the travels was published in 1826 under the title of Narrative of Travels and Discoveries in
See also:
Northern and Central Africa in the years 1822-1824 . Immediately after his return Clapperton was raised to the rank of
See also:
commander, and sent out with another expedition to Africa, the sultan Bello of Sokoto having professed his eagerness to open up trade with the west coast . Clapperton landed at Badagry in the Bight of
See also:
Benin, and started overland for the Niger on the 7th of December 1825, having with him his servant Richard Lander (q.v.), Captain Pearce, R.N., and Dr Morrison, navy surgeon and naturalist . Before the month was out Pearce and Morrison were dead of fever . Clapperton continued his journey, and, passing through the Yoruba country, in January 1826 he crossed the Niger at
See also:
Bussa, the spot where Mungo Park had died twenty years before .

In

See also:
July he arrived at Kano . Thence he went to Sokoto, intending afterwards to go to Bornu . The sultan, however, detained him, and being seized with dysentery he died near Sokoto on the 13th of
See also:
April 1827 . Clapperton was the first
See also:
European to make known from
See also:
personal observation the semi-civilized
See also:
Hausa countries, which he visited soon after the establishment of the Sokoto empire by the Fula . In 1829 appeared the Journal of a Second Expedition into the Interior of Africa, &c., by the
See also:
late Commander Clapperton, to which was prefaced a
See also:
biographical sketch of the explorer by his
See also:
uncle, Lieut.-colonel S . Clapperton . Lander, who had brought back the journal of his master, also published Records of Captain Clapperton's Last Expedition to Africa . . . with the subsequent Adventures of the Author (2 vols.,
See also:
London, 1830) .

End of Article: HUGH CLAPPERTON (1788-1827)
[back]
JEAN LOUIS RENA ANTOINE EDOUARD CLAPAREDE (1832–1...
[next]
CLAQUE (Fr. claquer, to clap the hands)

Additional information and Comments

There are no comments yet for this article.
» Add information or comments to this article.
Please link directly to this article:
Highlight the code below, right click and select "copy." Paste it into a website, email, or other HTML document.