Online Encyclopedia

COMMENDATION (from the Lat. commendar...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V06, Page 765 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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COMMENDATION (from the Lat. commendare, to entrust to the charge of, or to procure a favour for), approval, especially when expressed to one person on behalf of another, a recommendation. The word is used in a liturgical sense for an office commending the souls of the dying and dead to the mercies of God. In feudal law the term is applied to the practice of a freeman placing himself under the protection of a lord (see FEUDALISM), and in ecclesiastical law to the granting of benefices in commendam. A benefice was held in commendam when granted either temporarily until a vacancy was filled up, or to a layman, or, in case of a monastery or abbey, to a secular cleric to enjoy the revenues and privileges for life (see ABBO:), or to a bishop to hold together with his see. An act of 1836 prohibited the holding of benefices in commendam in England.
End of Article: COMMENDATION (from the Lat. commendare, to entrust to the charge of, or to procure a favour for)
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COMMENTARII (Lat. = Gr. broµvijµara)

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