Online Encyclopedia

DOCKET (perhaps from " dock," to curt...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V08, Page 364 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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DOCKET (perhaps from " dock," to curtail or cut short, with the diminutive suffix et, but the origin of the word is obscure; it has come into use since the 15th century), in law, a brief summary or digest of a case, or a memorandum of legal decisions; also the alphabetical list of cases down for trial, or of suits pending. Such cases are said to be " on the docket." In commercial use, a docket is a warrant from the custom-house, stating that the duty on goods entered has been paid, or the label fastened to goods, showing their destination, value, contents, &c., and, generally, any indorsement on the back of a document, briefly setting out its contents.
End of Article: DOCKET (perhaps from " dock," to curtail or cut short, with the diminutive suffix et, but the origin of the word is obscure; it has come into use since the 15th century)
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