Online Encyclopedia

DOOM (Old Eng. dOm, a word common to ...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V08, Page 419 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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DOOM (Old Eng. dOm, a word common to Tent. languages for that which is set up or ordered, from " do," in its original meaning of " place "; cf, Gr. &Ass, from stem of ri'rust), originally a law or enactment, the legal decision of a judge, and particularly an adverse sentence on a criminal. The word is thus applicable to the adverse decrees of fate, and particularly to the day of judgment. The verb " deem," to deliver a judgment, and hence to give or hold an opinion, is a derivative, and appears also in various old Teutonic forms. It is seen in " deemster," the name of the two judges of the Isle of Man.
End of Article: DOOM (Old Eng. dOm, a word common to Tent. languages for that which is set up or ordered, from " do," in its original meaning of " place "; cf, Gr. &Ass, from stem of ri'rust)
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