Online Encyclopedia

JOHN HENRY FOLEY (1818-1874)

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Originally appearing in Volume V10, Page 599 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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JOHN HENRY FOLEY (1818-1874)  , Irish sculptor, was born at
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Dublin on the 24th of May 1818 . At thirteen he began to study
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drawing and modelling at the
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schools of the Royal Dublin Society, where he took several first-class prizes . In 1835 he was admitted a student in the schools of the Royal Academy,
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London . He first appeared as an exhibitor in 1839 with his "
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Death of Abel and Innocence." " Ino and Bacchus," exhibited in 184o, gave him immediate reputation, and the
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work itself was after-wards commissioned to be done in marble for the
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earl of
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Ellesmere . " Lear and Cordelia " and " Death of Lear " were exhibited in 1841 . "
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Venus rescuing
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Aeneas " and " The Houseless Wanderer " in 1842, " Prospero and Miranda " in 1843 . In 1844 Foley sent to the
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exhibition at Westminster Hall his " Youth at a Stream," and was, with Calder Marshall and John Bell, chosen by the commissioners to do work in sculpture for the decoration of the Houses of Parliament . Statues of John Hampden and Selden were executed for this purpose, and received liberal praise for the propriety, dignity and proportion of their treatment . Commissions of all kinds now began to come rapidly . Fanciful
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works, busts, bas-reliefs, tablets and monumental statues were in
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great numbers undertaken and executed by him with a steady equality of worthy treatment . In 1849 he was made an associate and in 1858 a member of the Royal Academy . Among his numerous works the following may be noticed, besides those mentioned above:—" The
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Mother "; "
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Egeria," for the Mansion House; " The Elder
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Brother in Comus," his diploma work; " The Muse of
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Painting," the monument of James Ward, R.A.; "
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Caractacus," for the Mansion House; "
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Helen Faucit"; " Goldsmith " and " Burke," for Trinity College, Dublin; " Faraday "; " Reynolds "; " Barry," for Westminster Palace Yard; " John Stuart Mill," for the
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Thames
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embankment; " O'Connell " and " Gough," for Dublin ; " Clyde," for
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Glasgow; " Clive," for Shrewsbury; " Hardinge," " Canning " and " Outram," for
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Calcutta; " Hon .

James

Stewart," for
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Ceylon; the symbolical
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group "
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Asia," as well as the statue of the prince himself, for the Albert Memorial in Hyde Park; and " Stonewall Jackson," in Richmond, Va . The statue of
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Sir James Outram is probably his masterpiece . Foley's early fanciful works have some charming qualities; but he will probably always be best remembered for the workmanlike and manly style of his monumental portraits . He died at
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Hampstead on the 27th of August 1874, and on the 4th of September was buried in St Paul's
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cathedral . He
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left his
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models to the Royal Dublin Society, his early school, and a great
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part of his
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property to the Artists' Benevolent Fund . See W . Cosmo Monkhouse, The Works of J . H . Foley (1875) .

End of Article: JOHN HENRY FOLEY (1818-1874)
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