Online Encyclopedia

EMMANUEL FREMIET (1824- )

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Originally appearing in Volume V11, Page 97 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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EMMANUEL FREMIET (1824- ), French sculptor, born in Paris, was a nephew and pupil of Rude; he chiefly devoted himself to animal sculpture and to equestrian statues in armour; His earliest work was in scientific lithography (osteology), and for a while he served in times of adversity in the gruesome office of " painter to the Morgue." In 1843 he sent to the Salon a study of a " Gazelle," and after that date' was very prolific in his works. His " Wounded Bear " and " Wounded Dog " were produced in 185o, and the Luxembourg Museum at once secured this striking example of his work. From 1855 to 1859 Fremiet was engaged on a series of military statuettes for Napoleon III. He produced his equestrian statue of " Napoleon I." in 1868, and of " Louis d'Orleans" in 1869 (at the Chi3.teau de Pierrefonds) and in 1874 the first equestrian statue of " Joan of Arc," erected in the Place des Pyramides, Paris; this he afterwards (1889) replaced with another and still finer version. In the meanwhile he had exhibited his masterly " Gorilla and Woman " which won him a medal of honour at the Salon of 1887. Of the same character, and even more remarkable, is his " Ourang-Outangs and Borneo Savage " of 1895, a commission from the Paris Museum of Natural History. Fremiet also executed the statue of " St Michael " for the summit of the spire of the Eglise St Michel, and the equestrian statue of Velasquez for the Jardin de 1'Infante at the Louvre. He became a member of the Academie des Beaux-Arts in 1892, and succeeded Barye as professor of animal drawing at the Natural History Museum of Paris.
End of Article: EMMANUEL FREMIET (1824- )
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