Online Encyclopedia

GOUGE (adopted from the Fr. gouge, de...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V12, Page 281 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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GOUGE (adopted from the Fr. gouge, derived from the Late Lat. gubia or gulbia, in Ducange gulbium, an implement ad hortum excolendum; and also instrumentum ferreum in usu fabrorum; according to the New English Dictionary the word is probably of Celtic origin, gylf, a beak, appearing in Welsh, and gilb, a boring tool, in Cornish), a tool of the chisel type with a curved blade, used for scooping a groove or channel in wood, stone, &c. (see Tool). A similar instrument is used in surgery for operations involving the excision of portions of bone. " Gouge " is also used as the name of a bookbinder's tool, for impressing a curved line on the leather, and for the line so impressed. In mining, a " gouge " is the layer of soft rock or earth sometimes found in each side of a vein of coal or ore, which the miner can scoop out with his pick, and thus attack the vein more easily from the side. The verb " to gouge " is used in the sense of scooping or forcing out.
End of Article: GOUGE (adopted from the Fr. gouge, derived from the Late Lat. gubia or gulbia, in Ducange gulbium, an implement ad hortum excolendum; and also instrumentum ferreum in usu fabrorum; according to the New English Dictionary the word is probably of Celtic ori
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MARTIN GOUGE (c. 1360–1444)

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