Online Encyclopedia

COMTE DE MARQUIS DE GRASSETILLY FRANC...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V12, Page 369 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
Spread the word: del.icio.us del.icio.us it!
COMTE DE MARQUIS DE GRASSETILLY FRANCOIS JOSEPH PAUL GRASSE (1722-1788), French sailor, was born at Bar, in the present department of the Alpes Maritimes. In 1734 he took service on the galleys of the order of Malta, and in 1740 entered the service of France, beingpromoted to chief of squadron in 1779. He took part in the naval operations of the American War of Independence, and distinguished himself in the battles of Dominica and Saint Lucia (1780), and of Tobago (1780. He was less fortunate at St Kitts, where he was defeated by Admiral Hood. Shortly afterwards, in April 1782, he was defeated and taken prisoner by Admiral Rodney. Some months later he re-turned to France, published a Memoire justificatif, and was acquitted by a court-martial (1784). He died at Paris in January 1 788. His son Alexandre de Grasse, published a Notice bibliographique sur l'amiral comte de Grasse d'apres les documents inedits in 1840. See G. Lacour-Gayet, La Marine militaire de la France sous le regne de Louis X V (Paris, 1902).
End of Article: COMTE DE MARQUIS DE GRASSETILLY FRANCOIS JOSEPH PAUL GRASSE (1722-1788)
[back]
GRASSE
[next]
GRASSES

Additional information and Comments

The article fails to mention the fact that De Grasse fought a tactically undecisive battle against the Royal Navy off Cape Henry and subsequently successfully denied entry to the British into Chesapeake Bay. He thereby prevented them from relieving their army under Lord Cornwallis which was besieged by the French and Americans at Yorktown and thus forced the surrender of that army in October 1781. Subsequently, this proved to have been the decisive moment of the American Revolutionary War. De Grasse's tactically undecisive battle may therefore be seen as the strategically conclusive event of the American Revolution and thus a major event that changed the course of history.
1) The name of the city is "Le Bar sur Loup" and not just "Bar". I should know I lived there. 2)Also, The Admiral de Grasse was "Marquis de Tilly" and not "Marquis de Grassetilly".
» Add information or comments to this article.
Please link directly to this article:
Highlight the code below, right click and select "copy." Paste it into a website, email, or other HTML document.