Online Encyclopedia

HACKNEY (from Fr. haquenee, Lat. equu...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V12, Page 794 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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HACKNEY (from Fr. haquenee, Lat. equus, an ambling horse or mare, especially for ladies to ride; the English " hack " is simply an abbreviation), originally a riding-horse. At the present day, however, the hackney (as opposed to a thorough-bred) is bred for driving as well as riding (see HORSE: Breeds). From the hiring-out of hackneys, the word came to be associated with employment for hire (so " a hack," as a general term for " drudge "), especially in combination, e.g. hackney-chair, hackney-coach, hackney-boat. The hackney-coach, a coach with four wheels and two horses, was a form of hired public conveyance (see CARRIAGE).
End of Article: HACKNEY (from Fr. haquenee, Lat. equus, an ambling horse or mare, especially for ladies to ride; the English " hack " is simply an abbreviation)
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