Online Encyclopedia

WILLIAM HAWES (1785–1846)

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V13, Page 94 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
Spread the word: del.icio.us del.icio.us it!
WILLIAM HAWES (1785–1846), English musician, was born in London in 1785, and was for eight years (1793–1801) a chorister of the Chapel Royal, where he studied music chiefly under Dr Ayrton. He subsequently held various musical posts, being in 1817 appointed master of the children of the Chapel Royal. He also carried on the business of a music publisher, and was for many years musical director of the Lyceum theatre, then devoted to English opera. In the last-named capacity (July 23rd, 1824), he introduced Weber's Der Freischiitz for the first time in England, at first slightly curtailed, but soon afterwards in its entirety. Winter's Interrupted Sacrifice, Mozart's Cosi fan tulle, Marschner's Vampyre and other important works were also brought out under his auspices. Hawes also wrote or compiled the music for numerous pieces. Better were his glees and madrigals, of which he published several collections. He also superintended a new edition of the celebrated Triumph of Oriana. He died on the 18th of February 1846.
End of Article: WILLIAM HAWES (1785–1846)
[back]
STEPHEN HAWES (fl. 1502-1521)
[next]
HAWFINCH

Additional information and Comments

There are no comments yet for this article.
» Add information or comments to this article.
Please link directly to this article:
Highlight the code below, right click and select "copy." Paste it into a website, email, or other HTML document.