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INULIN (C6H10O5)x, in chemistry, a st...

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Originally appearing in Volume V14, Page 717 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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INULIN (C6H10O5)x, in chemistry, a starch-like carbohydrate, known also as alantin, menyanthin, dahlin, synanthrin and sinistrin. It occurs in many plants of the large genus Composilae, to which the elicampane (Lat. inula) belongs; and forms a white tasteless powder, sparingly soluble in cold water, very soluble in hot water and insoluble in alcohol. It is not coloured blue by iodine; and it reduces ammoniacal silver and gold solutions, but not Fehling's solution. Heated with water or dilute acids, it is converted into laevulose.
End of Article: INULIN (C6H10O5)x, in chemistry, a starch-like carbohydrate, known also as alantin, menyanthin, dahlin, synanthrin and sinistrin. It occurs in many plants of the large genus Composilae, to which the elicampane (Lat. inula)
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INTUITION (from Lat. intueri, to look at)
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Johnny Demonic and The Radiation Crisis - Cancer. The Processive state of Crystalline factor Dust ( Make -Up ) with Chemistry Balance on Cellulose , with Contact lenes to Eye Glass Factor's. Excellant as Gallery Count Continues.
The genus is "Compositae" w/a t, not an L. Elecampane is so-spelled w/an e not an i. I was wondering if the word "inulin" is so close to the word "insulin" for their connection of one affecting the other--?
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