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JOURNEY (through O. Fr. jornee or jou...

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Originally appearing in Volume V15, Page 525 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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JOURNEY (through O. Fr. jornee or journee, mod. Fr. journee, from med. Lat. diurnata, Lat. diurnus, of or belonging to dies, day), properly that which occupies a day in its performance, and so a day's work, particularly a day's travel, and the distance covered by such, usually reckoned in the middle ages as twenty miles. The word is now used of travel covering a certain amount of distance or lasting a certain amount of time, frequently defined by qualifying words. " Journey " is usually applied to travel by land, as opposed to " voyage," travel by sea. The early use of journey " for a day's work, or the amount produced by a day's work, is still found in glassmaking, and also at the British Mint, where a " journey " is taken as equivalent to the coinage of 15 lb of standard gold, 701 sovereigns, and of 6o lb of silver. The term " journeyman " also preserves the original significance of the word. It distinguishes a qualified workman or mechanic from an " apprentice " on the one hand and a " master " on the other, and is applied to one who is employed by another person to work at his trade or occupation at a day's wage.
End of Article: JOURNEY (through O. Fr. jornee or journee, mod. Fr. journee, from med. Lat. diurnata, Lat. diurnus, of or belonging to dies, day)
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