Online Encyclopedia

NICOLAS LANCRET (1660-1743)

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V16, Page 153 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
Spread the word: del.icio.us del.icio.us it!
NICOLAS LANCRET (1660-1743), French painter, was born in Paris on the 22nd of January 166o, and became a brilliant depicter of light comedy which reflected the tastes and manners of French society under the regent Orleans. His first master was Pierre d'Ulin, but his acquaintance with and admiration for Watteau induced him to leave d'Ulin for Gillot, whose pupil Watteau had been. Two pictures painted by Lancret and exhibited on the Place Dauphine had a great success, which laid the foundation of his fortune, and, it is said, estranged Watteau, who had been complimented as their author. Lancret's work cannot now, however, be taken for that of Watteau, for both in drawing and in painting his touch, although intelligent, is dry, hard and wanting in that quality which distinguished his great model; these characteristics are due possibly in part to the fact that he had been for some time in training under an engraver. The number of his paintings (of which over eighty have been engraved) is immense; he executed a few portraits and attempted historical composition, but his favourite subjects were balls, fairs, village weddings, &c. The British Museum possesses an admirable series of studies by Lancret in red chalk, and the National Gallery, London, shows four paintings—the " Four Ages of Man " (engraved by Desplaces and 1'Armessin), cited by d'Argenville amongst the principal works of Lancret. In 1719 he was received as Academician, and became councillor in 1735; in 1741 he married a grandchild of Boursault, author of Aesop at Court. He died on the 14th of September 1743. See d'Argenville, Vies des peintres; and Ballot de Sovot, Eloge de M. Lancret (1743, new ed. 1874).
End of Article: NICOLAS LANCRET (1660-1743)
[back]
LANCIANO (anc. Anxanum)
[next]
LAND

Additional information and Comments

There are no comments yet for this article.
» Add information or comments to this article.
Please link directly to this article:
Highlight the code below, right click and select "copy." Paste it into a website, email, or other HTML document.