Online Encyclopedia

HENRY LAZARUS (1815–1895)

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Originally appearing in Volume V16, Page 314 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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HENRY LAZARUS (1815–1895), British clarinettist, was born in London on the 1st of January 1815, and was a pupil of Blizard, bandmaster of the Royal Military Asylum, Chelsea, and subsequently of Charles Godfrey, senior, bandmaster of the Coldstream Guards. He made his first appearance as a soloist at a concert of Mme Dulcken's, in April 1838, and in that year 1 The English Bible does not use Lat. Dives (rich) as a proper name, saying merely " a certain rich man." The idea that Dives was a proper name arose from the Vulgate quidam dives, whence it became a conventional name for a rich man, he was appointed as second clarinet to the Sacred Harmonic Society. From Willman's death in 1840 Lazarus was principal clarinet at the opera, and all the chief festivals and orchestral concerts. His beautiful tone, excellent phrasing and accurate execution were greatly admired. He was professor of the clarinet at the Royal Academy of Music from 1854 until within a short time of his death, and was appointed to teach his instrument at the Military School of Music, Kneller Hall, in 1858. His last public appearance was at a concert for his benefit in St James's Hall, in June 1892, and he died on the 6th of March 1895.
End of Article: HENRY LAZARUS (1815–1895)
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Additional information and Comments

Two sentences from some other unrelated article on the Biblical Lazarus have mysteriously migrated into this entry on Henry Lazarus, the clarinetist. The intrusion consists of the 3rd and 4th sentences in the present article. It begins with the number 1 and ends with a comma. The interloping portion is quoted below: "1 The English Bible does not use Lat. Dives (rich) as a proper name, saying merely " a certain rich man." The idea that Dives was a proper name arose from the Vulgate quidam dives, whence it became a conventional name for a rich man,"
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