Online Encyclopedia

LOUIS X

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V17, Page 38 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
Spread the word: del.icio.us del.icio.us it!
LOUIS X. (1289—1316), king of France and Navarre, called le Hutin or " the Quarreller," was the son of Philip IV. and of Jeanne of Navarre. He was born at Paris on the 4th of October 1289, took the title king of Navarre on the death of his mother, on the 2nd of April 1305, and succeeded Philip IV. in France on the 29th of November 1314, being crowned at Reims in August 1315. The origin of his surname is uncertain. Louis X. is a somewhat indistinct figure among the kings of France, the preponderating influence at court during his short reign being that of his uncle, Charles of Valois. The reign began with reaction against the policy of Philip IV. Private vengeance was wreaked on Enguerrand de Marigny, who was hanged, Pierre de Latilli; bishop of Chalons and chancellor, and Raoul de Presle, advocate of the parlement, who were imprisoned. The leagues of the lesser country gentry, formed in 1314 before the accession of Louis, continued to demand the ancient privileges of the nobility,—tourneys, private wars and judgment of nobles not by king's officers but by their peers—and to protest against the direct call by the king of their vassals to the royal army. Louis X. granted them charters in which he made apparent concessions, but used evasive formulas which in reality ceded nothing. There was a charter to the Normans, one to the Burgundians, one to the Languedocians (1315). Robert de Bethune, count of Flanders, refused to do homage, and his French fiefs were declared confiscate by a court of his peers. In August 1315 Louis X. led an army toward Lille, but the flooded Lys barred his passage, the ground was so soaked with rains that the army could not advance, and it was thrown back, without a battle, on Tournai. Need of money inspired one famous ordinance of this reign; in 1315 the serfs of the royal domains were invited to buy their civil liberty,—an invitation which did not meet with great enthusiasm, as the freedman was merely freed for further exploitation, and Philip V. was obliged to renew it in 1318. Louis X. died suddenly on the 5th of June 1316. His first wife was Margaret, daughterof Robert II., duke of Burgundy; she was accused of adultery and died a prisoner in the chateau Gaillard. By her he had one daughter, Jeanne, wife of Philip, count of Evreux and king of Navarre. By his second wife Clemence, daughter of Charles Martel, titular king of Hungary, he left a posthumous son, King John I. See Ch. Dufayard, " La reaction feodale sous les fils de Philippe le Bel," in Revue historique (1894) ; Paul Lehugeur, Histoire de Philippe le Long, roi de France (Paris, 1897) ; and Joseph Petit, Charles de Valois (Paris, 1900). (J. T. S.*)
End of Article: LOUIS X
[back]
LOUIS VIII
[next]
LOUIS XI

Additional information and Comments

There are no comments yet for this article.
» Add information or comments to this article.
Please link directly to this article:
Highlight the code below, right click and select "copy." Paste it into a website, email, or other HTML document.