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GEORGE BRUCE MALLESON (1825-1898)

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Originally appearing in Volume V17, Page 491 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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GEORGE BRUCE MALLESON (1825-1898), Indian officer and author, was born at Wimbledon, on the 8th of May 1825. Educated at Winchester, he obtained• a cadetship in the Bengal infantry in 1842, and served through the second Burmese War. His subsequent appointments were in the civil line, the last being that of guardian to the young maharaja of Mysore.- He retired with the rank of colonel in 1877, having been created C.S.I. in ' Bishop Percy, was issued in 1770 under the title of Northern 1872. He died at Kensington, on the 1st of March 1898. He Antiquities (republished with additions in 1847). The book had was a voluminqus writer, his first work to attract attention a wide circulation, and attracted much attention on account of being the famous " Red Pamphlet," published at Calcutta in its being the first (though a very defective) translation into 1857, when the Mutiny was at its height. He continued, and French of the Edda. The king of Denmark showed his appreciaconsiderably rewrote the History of the Indian Mutiny ( 6 vols., tion by choosing Mallet to be preceptor of the crown prince. In 1878–188o), which was begun but left unfinished by Sir John 176o he returned to Geneva, and became professor of history in Kaye. Among his other books the most valuable are History his native city. While there he was requested by the czarina of the French in India (2nd ed., 1893) and The Decisive Battles of to undertake the education of the heir-apparent of Russia (after-India (3rd ed., 1888). wards the czar Paul I.), but declined the honour. An invitation
End of Article: GEORGE BRUCE MALLESON (1825-1898)
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