Online Encyclopedia

METONYMY (Gr. µerwvvµia, change of na...

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V18, Page 299 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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METONYMY (Gr. µerwvvµia, change of name, from µEra denoting change, and avo.ia, name), a figure of speech, in which the name of one thing is changed for that of another, to which it is related by association of ideas, as having close relationship to one another. Thus " sceptre," "'throne," " crown," are used for royal power or authority, " hearth and home " is used for " country," &c. " Synecdoche " (Gr. Qvveichoxi, from ouveai3ixeo-Oat, to join in receiving) is a rhetorical figure similar to metonymy, in which the part is used for the whole or vice versa, thus " hands " is used for the members of the crew of a vessel; a regiment of infantry is said to number so many " bayonets," &c.
End of Article: METONYMY (Gr. µerwvvµia, change of name, from µEra denoting change, and avo.ia, name)
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