Online Encyclopedia

[MARIE] PAUL HYACINTHE MEYER (184o- )

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Originally appearing in Volume V18, Page 349 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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[MARIE] PAUL HYACINTHE MEYER (184o- ), French philologist, was born in Paris on the 17th of January 1840. He was educated at the ?cote des Chartes, and in 1863 was attached to the manuscript department of the Bibliotheque Nationale. In 1876 he became professor of the languages and literatures of southern Europe at the College de France. In 1882 he was made director of the ficole des Chartes, and a year later was nominated' a member of the Academy of Inscriptions. He was one of the founders of the Revue critique, arid a founder and the chief contributor to Romania (1872). Paul Meyer began with the study of old Provencal literature, but subsequently did valuable work in many different departments of romance literature, and ranks as the chief modern authority on the French language. He is the author of Rap ports sur les documents manuscrits de l'ancienne litterature de la France conserves clans les bibliotheques de la Grande Bretagne (1871); Recueil d'anciens textes bas-latins, provencaux et francais (2 parts, 1874-1876); Alexandre le Grand clans la litterature francaise du moyen age (2 vols., 1886). He edited a great number of old French texts for the Societe des anciens textes francais, the Societe de l'histoire de France and independently. Among these may be mentioned Aye d'Avignon (1861), with Guessard; Flamenca (*_865); the Histoire of Guillaume le Marechal (3 vols., 1892-1902); Raoul de Cambrai (1882), with A. Longnon; Fragments d'une vie da Saint Thomas de Cantorbery (1885); Guillaume de la Barre (1894).
End of Article: [MARIE] PAUL HYACINTHE MEYER (184o- )
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