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THOMAS MOORE (1779-1852)

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Originally appearing in Volume V18, Page 811 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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THOMAS MOORE (1779-1852), Irish poet, was born in Dublin on the 28th of May 1779. His father was John Moore, a prosperous grocer and wine merchant, and his mother's maiden name was Anastasia Codd. In 1793 Tom Moore's name first appeared in print, as a contributor of some verses " To Zelia," to a Dublin periodical, the Anthologia Hibernica. In the same year Roman Catholic students began to be admitted to Trinity College, Dublin, and in 1794 Moore's name was entered on the books, curiously enough, as a Protestant. At Trinity he made friends with Robert Emmet, and was nearly dragged into the plots of the United Irishmen. The events of 1798 and the execution of Emmet in 1803 made a deep impression on him. The words of Emmet's address to his judges, asking the charity of silence—" Let no man write my epitaph "—are enshrined by Moore in one of his lyrics, "Oh, breathe not his name!" (Irish Melodies, 18o8). The next song in the same collection—" When he who adores thee "—also owes its inspiration to Emmet's fate, and the conscientious Orientalism of Lalla Rookh does not conceal the pre-occupation of the writer with the United Irishmen when he writes of " The Fire Worshippers," and with Emmet and Sarah Curran when he describes the loves of Hafed and Hinda, especially in the well-known song, " She is far from the Land where her young Hero sleeps." In 1798 Moore graduated, and in the next year left for England to keep his terms at the Middle Temple. He rapidly became a social success in London. Joseph Atkinson, secretary in Ireland to the ordnance board, had been attracted to Moore in Dublin at first by his gifts as a singer. He now gave him an introduction to Francis Rawdon-Hastings; 2nd earl of Moira, who invited him to his country seat at Donington Park, Leicestershire. Here Moore became a frequent guest. He had brought with him from Ireland a translation of the Odes of Anacreon, and the prince of Wales consented to have the volume dedicated to him. It was issued in 1800 with notes and a list of distinguished subscribers. His social successes involved him in expenses far beyond his means. His publisher had advanced him money, and he resolved to pay his debt by the anonymous publication of his juvenile poems, The Poetical Works of the Late Thomas Little, Esq. (18o1), a collection of love poems which Moore afterwards regretted. Through Lord Moira's influence he was, in 1803, appointed registrar of the admiralty prize-court at Bermuda. He went there to take possession of the post, but soon tired of the monotonous life, and in 1804, after appointing a deputy, returned to England by way of the United States and Canada. In 18o6 he published Epistles, Odes and other Poems, chiefly dealing with his impressions of travel. The volume contained the " Canadian Boat Song " (" Faintly as tolls the evening chime "), and some love poems of the same kind as those connected with the name of " Mr Little." Jeffrey made an unjustifiable onslaught on this collection in the Edinburgh Review for July 18o6. Moore was in his view " the most licentious of modern versifiers, and the most poetical of those who, in our time, have devoted their talents to the propagation of immorality," and the book was a " public nuisance." Moore challenged Jeffrey, and a duel was arranged at Chalk Farm. The police interrupted the proceedings. Jeffrey's pistol was found to be unloaded, and the ludicrous affair ended in a fast friendship between them. The success of the satirical epistles in the 18o6 volume encouraged Moore to produce further work of a similar kind, Corruption and Intolerance, Two Poems (18o8), and The Sceptic: a Philosophical Satire (1809), but the heroic couplet and the manner of Pope did not suit his talents. At the end of 18o6 he went to Dublin, and, with the exception of about six months in 1807 spent at Donington Park, the next three years were spent in Ireland. Here he met Miss Elizabeth Dyke, an actress, who became his wife in March 1811. They lived at first in London, but soon removed into the country, to Kegworth, near Lord Moira's seat, and then to Mayfield Cottage, near Ashbourne, Derbyshire. Moore had to spend much of his time in London, for the popularity of his songs led to an agreement with his publisher to increase the success of these by singing them himself at great houses. The inception of his Irish Melodies dates from 1807, and many of the best were written during the three years of his Irish visit. He had already published separate songs, some of them set to music of his own, when William Power suggested to him in 1807 the task of fitting words to a series of Irish airs supplied by Sir John Stevenson. He could not have found a task more exactly suited to his powers, and for a quarter of a century he enjoyed a regular income of £500 a year from Power for writing words to music. The first number of the Irish Melodies appeared in 18o8, and contained some of his best and most popular work. The rest appeared between 18o8 and 1834. In 1816 Stevenson and Moore published Sacred Songs, followed by a second number in 1824. In 1818 they began to adapt melodies from other nations. The first number of National Airs appeared in 1818, and was followed by others in 1820, 1822, 1826, and 1827. After 1812 he broke ground in a new field—political squib-writing. His first butt was the prince regent, once his friend and patron, whose foibles, fatness, love for cutlets and curacoa, for aged mistresses and practical jokes, were ridiculed with the lightest of clever hands. His earlier political poems appeared in the Morning Chronicle, but in 1813 he published a thin volume of Intercepted Letters: The Twopenny Post Bag. Other volumes of squibs, most of which passed through several editions, followed: The World at Westminster (1816), The Fudge Family in Paris (1818), The Journal of a Member of the Pococurante Society (182o), Fables for the Holy Alliance (1823), Odes on Cash, Corn, Catholics, and other Matters (1828), The Fudge Family in England (1835). The only failure among his satirical writings was Tom Crib's Memorial to Congress (1819) for which he had made an elaborate study of thieves' argot. In 1814 he contracted with the firm of Longmans to supply a metrical romance on an Eastern subject, which should contain at least as many lines as Scott's Rokeby, the publishers binding themselves to pay 3000 guineas on delivery. Moore had begun Lalla Rookh two years before. He was a careful and laborious writer, and retired to a cottage in the neighbourhood of Donington Park, where with the help of Lord Moira's library he read himself slowly into familiarity with Eastern scenery and manners. He was already far advanced in his work when Byron in The Giaour and again in The Bride of Abydos largely forestalled him. The depression following on the peace of 1815 deferred the publication of Lalla Rookh until 1817. It was an immediate success. The Eastern local colouring which dazzled Moore's contemporaries has, however, faded, and the interest still existing in the poem is chiefly due to the under-current of Irish patriotism which he cleverly worked into it. Immediately after the completion of Lalla Rookh, Moore removed with his family to Sloperton Cottage, Wiltshire, where he was close to Bowood, Lord Lansdowne's country seat. Moore's plans were interrupted by the embezzlement of some £6000 by the deputy he had left in Bermuda, for whose default he was fully liable. To avoid a debtors' prison Moore retired to the Continent. He visited Byron in Italy, and in October 1819 received from him the first part of the Memoirs. The continuation was sent to Moore in Paris the next year, with Byron's suggestion that the reversion of the MS. should be sold. Moore did not remain long in Italy, but made his home in Paris, where he was joined by his wife and children. He was not able to return to England until 1822, when the Bermuda affair was compromised by a payment through Longmans of £r000. Moore had had many offers of help, but preferred to be indebted to his publishers only. During his exile he had written another Oriental poem, The Loves of the Angels (1822), which was hardly less popular than Lalla Rookh. He now became a contributor of satirical verse to The Times, the connexion lasting until 1827. He now wrote his Memoirs of the Life of Sheridan, first contemplated in 1814, which appeared, after some delay, in 1825. The Memoirs of Captain Rock (1824), in which he gives ahumorous but convincing account of English misgovernment in Ireland, was the result of a tour with Lord Lansdowne in western Ireland. His prose tale, The Epicurean, appeared in 1827, and the Legendary Ballads in 1830. In 1831 he completed his Life and Death of Lord Edward Fitzgerald, probably his best piece of prose work. The death of Byron in 1824 raised the question of the publication of his Memoirs. Moore had parted with them in 1821 to John Murray for £2000. After they had come into Murray's possession, Moore began to have doubts about the propriety of publishing them, and an arrangement was therefore made that the £2000 should be regarded as a loan, to be repaid during Byron's lifetime, and that the MS. should be retained as a security. When Byron died the Memoirs were still unredeemed, and the right of publication therefore rested with Murray. Moore now borrowed the money from Longmans and induced Murray to give up his claim. The money was paid, and, after a heated discussion with Byron's executors, the MS. was burnt. It was partly the pressure of the debt thus contracted, and partly the expressed wish of Byron, that induced Moore to undertake for Murray The Letters and Journals of Lord Byron, with Notices of his Life (183o). The difficult task was executed with great skill and tact, and it remains, with all its defects and omissions, a valuable record. Moore's countrymen desired him to accept a seat in parliament for Limerick. The offer was accompanied by a scheme to present Moore with an estate in the county worth boo a year. It was made through the poet Gerald Griffin, who has left on record an account of the interview. Moore declined the honour. In 183o he allowed himself to be drawn into a project for writing a History of Ireland (4 vols., 1835, 1837, 1840 and 1846) for Lardner's Cyclopaedia. He hoped that by writing the history of Ireland he might arouse in his own country-men an interest in their past, and open the eyes of Englishmen to the misgovernment of the country. He had neither the historical training nor the despatch in writing which enabled Scott to scribble off the companion volumes on Scotland, and the history sat like a nightmare on him, and was left unfinished on the melancholy collapse of his powers in 1845. He had, however, the temper of the student, and was always a voracious reader. Moore's last years were harassed by pecuniary difficulties, and by the weakness and misconduct of his sons, the elder of whom retired from the English army to enter the foreign legion of France. After the death of his last child in 1845, Moore became a total wreck, but he lived until the 25th of February 1852. He left sufficient provision for his wife in the Diary which he kept chiefly on her behalf. His other works are, A Letter to the Roman Catholics of Dublin (181o); A Melologue upon National Music (181I); an operetta, M.P. or The Blue Stocking (181 i) ; A Set of Glees (1827) ; The Summer Fete (1831); Evenings in Greece (1826-1832); Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Search of a Religion; Alciphron, a Poem (1839). See Memoirs, Journal and Correspondence of Thomas Moore (8 vols., 1853-1856), ed. by Lord John Russell, which contains an immense quantity of biographical material; The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore, Collected by Himself (to vols., 1840—1842); also Notes from the Letters of Thomas Moore to his Music Publisher, James Power (1854); and Prose and Verse, Humorous, Satirical and Sentimental, by Thomas Moore, with suppressed passages from the Memoirs of Lord Byron (1878), which includes Moore's contributions to the Edinburgh Review (1814-1834). Among modern editions of Moore's Poetical Works may be mentioned that by Charles Kent (the Centenary ed., 1879), and that by W. M. Rossetti (188o). Memoirs of Moore are prefixed to these editions. There are many contemporary references to him, especially in the journals and letters of Byron. There is an excellent life, by Stephen Gwynn, ThomasMoore (1905), written for the " English Men of Letters Series." See also monographs on'Moore, by G. Vallat (1886 and 1895), an essay on him as the poet " of Irish opposition and revolt " in Georg Brandes, Main Currents in Nineteenth Century Literature (vol. iv., 1875; Eng. trans., 1905).
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