Online Encyclopedia

1ST BARON SAMUEL JONES LOYD OVERSTONE

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V20, Page 384 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
Spread the word: del.icio.us del.icio.us it!
1ST BARON SAMUEL JONES LOYD OVERSTONE (1796- 1883), English barker, the only son of the Rev. Lewis Loyd, a Welsh dissenting minister, was born on the 25th of September 1796. He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. His father, who had married a daughter of John Jones, a banker of Manchester, had given up the ministry to take a partnership in his father-in-law 's bank, and had afterwards founded the London branch of Jones, Loyd & Co., afterwards incorporated in the London and Westminster Bank. Loyd, who had joined his father in the banking business, succeeded to it on the latter's retirement in 1844. He conducted the business so successfully that on his death he left personal property of over £2,000,000. He sat in parliament as liberal member for Hythe from 1819 to 1826, and unsuccessfully contested Manchester in 1832. As early as 1832 he was recognized as one of the foremost authorities on banking, and he enjoyed much influence with successive ministries and chancellors of the exchequer. He was created Baron Overstone in 1850. He died in London on the 17th of November 1883, leaving one daughter, who married Robert James Loyd-Lindsay, afterwards Lord Wantage.
End of Article: 1ST BARON SAMUEL JONES LOYD OVERSTONE
[back]
OVERSOUL (Ger. Uberseele)
[next]
OVERT ACT (0. Fr. overt, from ouvrir, to open)

Additional information and Comments

Eden Park, He lived in a house called Wickham Park on the site of the present Bethlem Royal Hospital. The book is published by Halsgrove and tells of the move of four Welsh brothers from Wales to England and the change of their name from Lloyd to Loyd.One of the roads in Shirley is called Overstone Gardens. Cheers Pat Manning
» Add information or comments to this article.
Please link directly to this article:
Highlight the code below, right click and select "copy." Paste it into a website, email, or other HTML document.