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PRINCE MIKHAIL DMITRIEVICH (2795-186I)

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Originally appearing in Volume V12, Page 246 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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PRINCE MIKHAIL DMITRIEVICH (2795-186I), brother of the last named, entered the Russian army in 1807 and took part in the campaigns against Persia in 181o, and in 1812-1815 against France. During the Russo-Turkish War of 1828—x829 he was present at the sieges of Silistria and Shumla. After being appointed, in 183o, a general officer, he was present in the campaign in Poland, and was wounded at the battle of Grochow, on the 25th of February 1831. He also distinguished himself at the battle of Ostrolenka and at the taking of Warsaw. For these services he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-general. In 1846 he was nominated military governor of Warsaw. In 1849 he commanded the Russian artillery in the war against the Hungarians, and in 1852 he visited London as a representative of the Russian army at the funeral of the duke of Wellington. At this time he was chief of the staff of the Russian army and adjutant-general to the tsar. Upon Russia declaring war against Turkey in 1853, he was appointed commander-in-chief of the troops which occupied Moldavia and Wallachia. In 1854 he crossed the Danube and besieged Silistria, but was superseded in April by Prince Paskevich, who, however, resigned on the 8th of June, when Gorchakov resumed the command. In July the siege of Silistria was raised, and the Russian armies recrossed the Danube; in August they withdrew to Russia. In 1855 he was appointed commander-in-chief of the Russian forces in the Crimea in place of Prince Menshikov. Gorchakov's defence of Sevastopol, and final retreat to the northern part of the town, which he continued to defend till peace was signed in Paris, were conducted with skill and energy. In 1856 he was appointed governor-general of Poland in succession to Prince Paskevich. He died at Warsaw on the 3oth of May 1861, and was buried, in accordance with his own wish, at Sevastopol.
End of Article: PRINCE MIKHAIL DMITRIEVICH (2795-186I)
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