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ROVUMA

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V23, Page 782 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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ROVUMA, a river in East Africa, forming during the greater of which is laid in Persepolis, was produced in 1700, and was part of its course the boundary between German and Portuguese followed in 1702 by Tamerlane. In this play the conqueror territory. The lower Rovuma is formed by the junction in represented William III., and Louis XIV. is denounced as 11° 25' S., 38° 31' E. of two branches of nearly equal importance, Bajazet. It was for many years regularly acted on the annithe longer of which, the Lujenda, comes from the south-west, versary of William's landing at Torbay. The Fair Penitent the other, which still bears the name Rovuma, from the (1703), an adaptation of Massinger and Field's Fatal Dowry, west. Its source lies on an undulating plateau, 3000 ft. was pronounced by Dr Johnson to be one of the most pleasing high, immediately to the east of Lake Nyasa, in 10° 45' S., tragedies in the language. In it occurs the famous character 35° 40' E., the head-stream flowing first due west before turning of Lothario, whose name passed into current use as the equivasouth and east. In its eastward course the Rovuma flows lent of. a rake. Calista is said to have suggested to Samuel near the base of the escarpment of an arid sandstone plateau Richardson the character of Clarissa Harlowe, as Lothario to the north, from which direction the streams, which have cut suggested Lovelace. In 1704 Rowe tried his hand at comedy, themselves deep channels in the plateau edge, have almost producing The Biter at Lincoln's Inn Fields. The play is said all short courses. On the opposite bank the Rovuma receives, to have amused no one except the author, and Rowe returned besides the Lujenda, the Msinje and Luchulingo, flowing in to tragedy in Ulysses (1706). The Royal Convert (1707) dealt broad valleys running from south to north. The Lujenda with the persecutions endured by Aribert, son of Hengist and rises in close proximity to Lake Chilwa, in the small Lake the Christian maiden Ethelinda. The Tragedy of Jane Shore, Chiuta (1700 ft.), the swamps to the south of this being separated which was played at Drury Lane with Mrs Oldfield in the title-from Chilwa only by a narrow wooded ridge. The stream which role in 1714, ran for nineteen nights, and kept the stage longer issues from Chiuta passes by a swampy valley into the narrow than any of his other works. The Tragedy of Lady Jane Grey Lake Amaramba, from which the Lujenda finally issues as a followed in 1715. Rowe's friendship with Pope, who speaks stream 8o yds. wide. Lower down it varies greatly in width, affectionately of his vivacity and gaiety of disposition, led to containing in many parts long wooded islands which rise above attacks inspired by the publisher Edmund Curll, the best the flood level, and are often inhabited. The river is fordable known of these being The New Rehearsal, or Bays the Younger, in many places in the dry season. At its mouth it is about a containing an Examen of Seven of Rowe's Plays, by Charles mile wide. The lower Rovuma, which is often half a mile Gildon. Rowe acted as under-secretary (1709—11) to the duke wide but generally shallow, flows through a swampy valley of Queensberry when he was principal secretary of state for flanked by plateau escarpments containing several small back- Scotland. On the accession of George I. he was made a surwaters of the river. The mouth, which lies in 10° 28' S., veyor of customs, and in 1715 he succeeded Nahum Tate as 40° 30' E., is entirely in German territory, the boundary near poet laureate. He was also appointed clerk of the council to the coast being formed by the parallel of 1o° 40'. The length the prince of Wales, and in 1718 was nominated by Lord of the Rovuma is about 500 M. Chancellor Parker as clerk of the presentations in Chancery.
End of Article: ROVUMA
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JOHN ROW (c. 1525—1580)

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