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SIR CHARLES SANTLEY (1834- )

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Originally appearing in Volume V24, Page 194 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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SIR CHARLES SANTLEY (1834- )  ,
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English vocalist, son of an organist at Liverpool, was born on the 28th of
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February 1834 . He was given a thorough musical
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education, and having determined to adopt the career of a singer, he went in 1855 to Milan and studied under Gaetano Nava . He had a
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fine baritone voice, and while in Italy he began singing small parts in opera . In 1857 he returned to
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London, and on 16th November made his first appearance in the
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part of Adam in The Creation at St Martin's Hall . In 1858, after appearing in
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January in The Creation, he sang the title-part in Elijah in March, both at Exeter Hall . In I859 he sang at Covent Garden as Hoel in the opera Dinorah, and in 1862 he appeared in
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Italian opera in Il Trovatore . He was then engaged by Mapleson for Her Majesty's, and his
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regular connexion with the English operatic stage only ceased in 1870, when he sang as Vanderdecken in The Flying Dutchman . His last appearance in opera was in the same part with the Carl Rosa
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Company at the
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Lyceum Theatre in 1876 . Meanwhile, in 1861 he sang Elijah at the
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Birmingham Festival, and in 1862 was engaged for the Handel Festival at the Crystal Palace . At the musical festivals and on the concert stage his success was immense . In such songs as " To Anthea," " Simon the Cellarer " or " Maid of Athens," he was unapproachable, and his
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oratorio singing carried on the finesttraditions of his
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art . He was knighted in 1907 .

In 1858

Santley married Gertrude Kemble, and their daughter, Edith Santley, had a
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great success as a concert singer .

End of Article: SIR CHARLES SANTLEY (1834- )
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