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HERMANN SCHULTZ (1836- )

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Originally appearing in Volume V24, Page 383 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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HERMANN SCHULTZ (1836- ), German Protestant theologian, was born at Luchow in Hanover on the 3oth of December 1836. He studied at Gottingen and Erlangen, became professor at Basel in 1864, and eventually (1876) professor ordinaries at Gottingen. Here he has also held the appointments of chief university preacher, councillor to the consistory (from 1881) and abbot of Bursfelde (189o). Professor Schultz's theological standpoint was that of a moderate liberal. " It is thought by many that he has succeeded in discovering the via media between the positions of Biblical scholars like Delitzsch on the one hand and Stade on the other " (Prof. J. A. Paterson). He is well known to British and American students as the author of an excellent work on Old Testament Theology (2 vols., 1869, 5th ed., 1896; Eng. trans., 2nd ed., 1895). uniformity of legislation throughout the states of Germany, in 1869, by the publication of Die Gesetzgebung fiber die privatrechtliche Stellung der Erwerbs- and Wirthschaftsgenossenschaften, &c. His life-work was now complete ; he had placed the advantages of capital and co-operation within the reach of struggling tradesmen throughout Germany. His remaining years were spent in consolidating this work. Both as a writer and a member of the Reichstag his industry was incessant, and he died in harness on the 29th of April 1883 at Potsdam, leaving the reputation of a benefactor to the smaller tradesmen and artisans, in which light he must be regarded rather than as the founder of true co-operative principles in Germany. (See also CO-OPERATION.)
End of Article: HERMANN SCHULTZ (1836- )
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