Online Encyclopedia

UPPER SIND FRONTIER

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V27, Page 782 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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UPPER

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SIND FRONTIER  , a
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district of
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British India, in the
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Sind province of Bombay, with administrative headquarters at
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Jacobabad .
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Area, 2621 sq. m . In the north-east the country is hilly; the remainder consists of a narrow
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strip of level plain, one
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half being covered with jungle and subject to inundation, from which it is protected by artificial embankments . The
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land is watered by canals from the
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Indus, of which the chief are the Begari and
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Desert canals . The district contains several thriving
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timber plantations . The
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climate is remarkable for its dryness and for its extraordinary variations of temperature . The
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annual rainfall at Jacobabad averages less than 5 in . In 1901 the population was 232,045, showing an increase of no less than 33% in the decade, chiefly due to immigration from
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Baluchistan . The
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principal crops are millets, oil-seeds, pulses, wheat and rice . The
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internal trade is principally in grain, the greater
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part of which is sent to the sea-board; the transit trade from Central
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Asia into Sind crosses the district, bringing wool and woollen goods, fruits, carpets and horses . The district is crossed by the
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Quetta branch of the North-Western railway . The wild Baluchi inhabitants were pacified by General John Jacob between 1847 and his
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death in 1858 .

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