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WOLLIN

Online Encyclopedia
Originally appearing in Volume V28, Page 777 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica.
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WOLLIN  , an

island of Germany, in the Prussian province of Pomerania, the more easterly of the islands at the mouth of the Oder which
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separate the Stettiner Haff from the Baltic Sea . It is divided from the mainland on the E. by the Dievenow Channel, and from
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Usedom on the W . 'by the
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Swine . It is roughly triangular in shape, and has an
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area of 95 sq. m . Heath and sand alternate with swamps, lakes and
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forest on its
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surface, which is flat, except towards the south-west, where the low hills of Lebbin rise . Cattle-rearing and fishing are the chief resources of the inhabitants, who number about 14,000 . Misdroy, on the N.W. coast, is a favourite sea-bathing resort, and some of the other villages, as Ostswine, opposite
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Swinemunde, Pritter, famous for its eels, and Lebbin, are also visited in summer . Wollin, the only
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town, is situated on the Dievenow, and is connected with the mainland by three bridges . It carries on the
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industries of a small seaport and fishing-town . Pop . (1900) 4679 . Near the
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modern town once stood the ancient and opulent Wendish city of Wolin or Jumne, called Julin by the Danes, and Winetha or Vineta (i.e .

Wendish town) by the Germans . In the loth and 11th centuries it was the centre of an active and extensive

trade . Adam of
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Bremen (d . 1076) extols its
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size and
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wealth, and mentions that Greeks and other foreigners frequented it, and that
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Saxons were permitted to settle there on equal terms with the
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Wends, so long as they did not obtrude the fact of their
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Christianity . The Northmen made a settlement here about 970, and built a fortress on the "
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silver hill," called Jomsburg, which is often mentioned in the sagas . Its foundation was attributed to a legendary
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Viking exiled from Denmark, called Palnotoke or Palnatoki . The stronghold of Jomsburg was destroyed in 1098 by King Magnus Barfod of Norway . This is probably the origin of the legend that Vineta was overthrown by a storm or
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earthquake and overwhelmed by the sea . Some submarine granite rocks near Damerow in Usedom are still popularly regarded as its ruins . The town of Wollin became in 1140 the seat of the Pomeranian bishopric, which was transferred to Kammin about 1170 . Wollin was burnt by Canute VI. of Den-mark in 1183, and was taken by the Swedes in 163o and 1759 and by the Brandenburgers in 1659 and 1675 . See Khull, Die Geschichte Palnatokis and der Jomsburger (
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Graz, 1892) ; Koch, Vineta in
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Prose and Poesie (
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Stettin, 1905) ; W. von Raumer, Die Insel Wollin (Berlin, 1851); Haas, Sagen and Erzdhlungen von den Inseln Usedom and Wallin (Stettin, 1904) .

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