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American Kennel Club - Dog Registration, AKC and Health, Recognized Breeds

dogs contains bred registered

The American Kennel Club is one of a number of registries for purebred dogs, however it remains the most recognized registry in America. In order for a dog to be eligible to be registered with the American Kennel Club, its parents must also be registered as the same breed. The litter the dog was born into must also be registered with the American Kennel Club. If this can be arranged, the dog can then be registered as purebred by the American Kennel Club. An American Kennel Club registry does not, however, indicate that a dog is healthy or of show-quality. It is not proof that the dog comes from a reliable breeder or that it was raised properly. The Board of Directors of the AKC signed a contract with Petland to assist in the registration of dogs sold by Petland. These dogs were bred by the Hunte Corporation, a large commercial dog breeder, also known as a “puppy mill.” Following a controversy, the AKC pulled the contract with Petland. The top five dogs registered with the AKC in 2006 were the Labrador Retriever, Yorkshire Terrier, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever and Beagle.

AKC and Health

The AKC supports research into canine health and runs an advertising campaign stating that the AKC is commited to healthy dogs, but this claim has been disputed. Unlike dog registries not located in the United States, the AKC does not have standards for healthy breeding. The only restriction placed on breeding states that a dog must be older than 8 months at the time of breeding. The AKC also prohibits its members from instituting further restrictions and testing for genetically inheritable diseases. Because of this, dedication to health varies greatly among breeders and is considered voluntary.

Recognized Breeds

The AKC recognizes just 157 breeds of dogs. It divides dog breeds into seven groups, one class, and the Foundation Stock Service. The seven groups are the Sporting Group, Hound Group, Working Group, Terrier Group, Toy Group, Non-Sporting Group, and Herding Group. The Sporting Group contains 26 breeds that were bred originally as bird dogs, including Pointers and Spaniels. The Hound Group contains 22 breeds that were bred as hunters, including Beagles and Greyhounds. The Working Group contains 24 breeds that were bred for various jobs and includes Siberian Huskies and Bernese Mountain Dogs. The Terrier Group contains 27 breeds that were bred to dig rodents from their burrows, including the Cairn and Airedale Terriers. The Toy Group contains 21 breeds and includes Toy Poodles. The Non-Sporting Group contains 17 breeds and includes Bichon Frises. The Herding Group contains 18 breeds that were bred to herd livestock, including German Shepherds and Border Collies.

American Negro Academy - EARLY MEMBERSHIP, OCCASIONAL PAPERS, INTERNAL PROBLEMS, THE NATURE OF THE MEMBERSHIP, THE FINAL YEARS [next] [back] American Indian Movement (AIM) - AIM’S BACKGROUND, EARLY AIM ACTIVISM, AIM AND ATHLETIC MASCOTS, EXPANDING THE AIM MISSION

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