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Fubu

demand market distribution john

Daymond John entered the fashion industry by selling tie-top hats on the street corners of Queens, New York, in the early 1990s. The immediate popularity of his hats lead John to assemble a team of his neighborhood friends to form the company FUBU. The idea behind FUBU (For Us by Us) was simple: “The consumer is making clothes for the consumer.” With this philosophy guiding the FUBU team, Daymond John, Keith Perrin, Carl Brown, J. Alexander Martin, and designer Kiki Peterson affixed the FUBU name on oversized t-shirts, hooded sweatshirts, baseball caps, and baggy jeans to create the new uniform of the hip-hop generation.

In 1993 John, then a waiter at a Red Lobster restaurant, decided to risk everything on his upstart company and took out a second mortgage on his home in Hollis, Queens, to convert his basement into a manufacturing and distribution center. The gamble paid off. Retailers, in both inner cities and suburbia, were developing urban sportswear departments, and by 1995 department store chains such as J.C. Penney, May, Macy’s, and Federated were looking for new labels to attract the African-American hip-hop market. What stunned the retailers, however, was the demand for FUBU products outside of this niche market. Teens everywhere wanted to dress like the Fugees, Wu-Tang Clan, and LL Cool J, and the FUBU label rapidly made the transition from niche brand to mainstream.

The increasing demand by consumers for urban sportswear resulted in the rapid ascent of many new companies, most of which were plagued by distribution problems associated with high-volume demand. Even early hip-hop pioneers such as Karl Kani suffered when his manufacturing and distribution operations could not sustain the ever-increasing demand. FUBU, which is operated under the Samsung Corporation, developed a limited distribution strategy to maintain demand and delivery. FUBU also focused on marketing strategy, drawing on friends such as LL Cool J to endorse their line and secure their market share through a carefully cultivated brand identity.

After securing their position in the urban sportswear market, FUBU began expanding its operations by developing new product lines and creating licensing agreements. Through licensing agreements with Pietrafesa and Phillips-VanHeusen, FUBU expanded into tailored clothing, dress shirts, and neckwear which are carried at prestigious establishments such as Brooks Brothers and Nordstrom. They hold several licensing agreements for women’s and men’s accessories, loungewear, footwear, and underwear, and they partnered with the National Basketball Association in 1999 to create a line of team-associated apparel. FUBU also developed a retail division with plans to open forty-five stores in various international locations by 2005. As a result of their apparel lines, licensing agreements, marketing strategies, and limited distribution, the FUBU label continues to be the leading company in the urban apparel market.

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over 5 years ago

american size medium

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over 5 years ago

american size medium