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Anderson,June

opera debut sang metropolitan

Anderson, June, admired American soprano; b. Boston, Dec. 30, 1952. She received singing lessons as a child and at age 14 made her first appearance in opera in a production of Toch’s Die Prinzessin aufder Erbse . In 1970 she was the youngest finalist in the Metropolitan Opera National Auditions. After taking her B.A. in French literature at Yale Univ. in 1974, she pursued vocal training in N.Y. with Robert Leonard. In 1976 she attracted favorable notice as soloist in Mozart’s Mass in C minor, K.427, with the N.Y. Choral Soc, and then sang at the Chicago Lyric Opera in 1977. On Oct. 26, 1978, she made her debut at the N.Y.C. Opera as the Queen of the Night, and continued to appear there until 1982 when she made her European debut as Semiramide in Rome. In 1983 she scored a major success in N.Y. when she sang Semiramide in a concert performance at Carnegie Hall. In 1984 she was tapped to sing the soundtrack for the Queen of the Night for the film version of Amadeus . She made her first appearance at the Paris Opéra as Isabelle in Robert le diable in 1985; in 1986 she won accolades at her debut at Milan’s La Scala as Amina, and later that year sang for the first time at London’s Covent Garden as Lucia. In 1988 she appeared with the Opera Orch. of N.Y. as Beatrice di Tenda with fine success. On Nov. 30, 1989, she made her Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. as Gilda to critical acclaim. Her debut at N.Y.‘s Carnegie Hall followed on Dec. 12, 1991. In 1992 she sang Lucia at the Metropolitan Opera. In 1993 she was heard as Bellini’s Elvira at the San Francisco Opera. In 1996 she appeared as Giovanna d’Arco at Covent Garden, and in 1997 as Norma in Chicago. She also was active as a concert singer.

Anderson,Laurie [next] [back] Anderson,Ivie(Marie;“Ivy”)

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